Personal
Home Bank accounts
Credit cards
Borrowing
Mortgages
Savings and investments
Insurance
Advice
Business
Home My business
Banking Solutions
International
Financing
Investing
Tips and Tools
Wealth Management
Home
CLOSE

What makes a good salesperson?

01 June 2016 by National Bank
DefaultArticleImageAltText

There’s an old saying that a good salesperson could sell ice to the Inuit. But these days, this couldn’t be farther from the truth...

Contenu

“Thankfully, things have changed,” says David Larose, president and founder of Orizon, a company specialized in training salespeople. “It wouldn’t take long for the Inuit to speak their minds! And today, an unsatisfied customer won’t talk to eleven people like they did in the past – they’ll speak to hundreds in a few seconds!”

We sat down to talk with Larose about his experience and how to find success in sales. We also got some good tips from his colleagues, Formax’s Guy Bourgeois and Prima-Ressources’ Frédéric Lucas, both founders of specialized sales and customer service companies.

Natural people skills and real interest

“You have to like people,” Bourgeois states. “Whether they’re pleasant or rude, you have to enjoy working with them.” These natural people skills can’t be forced or learned. You’ve either got it or you don’t, and you can only excel as a salesperson if you’ve got it.

The best salespeople are also good listeners and genuinely interested in what people have to say. “The better you understand people, the better salesperson you’ll be,” believes Bourgeois. Success in sales depends in large part on interpreting customers’ reactions. According to Bourgeois, the classic “I’ll think about it,” for instance, means that the customer is afraid of making a mistake.

David Larose also believes that good salespeople need to be personable, good listeners and warm.

“People think that salespeople talk a lot, but they’re mostly listening,” he adds. “To gather the information you need to close a sale, you have to actively listen to the customer.”

Paying attention to your customers also helps create a positive sales environment. “This is the only way to adapt your approach and language to the person you’re speaking with,” explains Larose. “You’re looking to have conversations that put your customer at ease. There’s no one-size-fits-all approach.”

A strong personal brand

In this day and age, according to Bourgeois, you can’t live your life in isolation. This is why it’s so important to create your personal brand.

“People buy the person before the service or the product. You need to sell yourself before you sell,” adds Bourgeois.

By taking control of your brand, you can gain notoriety and recognition for what you do. If your neighbour doesn’t know that you’re a realtor, for example, they won’t think to call you when they’re selling their house. And when people hire professionals, the first thing they do is check their online and social media presence. You make your first impression long before the first meeting!

Confidence in your added value

Gone are the days when customers only listened to salespeople. According to Bourgeois, they are more informed than ever, and more cautious.

“You need to be convinced of your own value as a salesperson,” says Larose. “You need to believe that regardless of the cost of your service, your added value will make the customer come out on top. That’s when you’ll find the right sales techniques and language.”

Prima-Ressources’ Lucas sees added value in the ability to properly confront the customer: “You have to get them to see things differently, surprise them and ask hard questions. A good salesperson can do this without resistance from the customer. It’s quite a talent!” In the end, the customer comes out of the conversation with added value, because they put more thought into their purchase.

All salespeople, regardless of their field, deal with rejection and refusal. Every day!

This is also the case for the best salespeople. Having nerves of steel and solid self-confidence is what separates those who stay the course from the rest. And experience is worth its weight in gold when it comes to developing a network and skills!

**

This article is provided by National Bank, its subsidiaries and group entities for information purposes only, and creates no legal or contractual obligation for National Bank, its subsidiaries and group entities. The details of this service offering and the conditions herein are subject to change.

Views expressed in this article are those of the person being interviewed. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of National Bank or its subsidiaries.

For financial or business advice, please consult your National Bank advisor, financial planner or an industry professional (e.g., accountant, tax specialist or lawyer).

© 2016 National Bank of Canada. All rights reserved. Any reproduction, in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited without the prior written consent of National Bank of Canada.

Legal disclaimer

Any reproduction, in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited without the prior written consent of National Bank of Canada.

The articles and information on this website are protected by the copyright laws in effect in Canada or other countries, as applicable. The copyrights on the articles and information belong to the National Bank of Canada or other persons. Any reproduction, redistribution, electronic communication, including indirectly via a hyperlink, in whole or in part, of these articles and information and any other use thereof that is not explicitly authorized is prohibited without the prior written consent of the copyright owner.

The contents of this website must not be interpreted, considered or used as if it were financial, legal, fiscal, or other advice. National Bank and its partners in contents will not be liable for any damages that you may incur from such use.

This article is provided by National Bank, its subsidiaries and group entities for information purposes only, and creates no legal or contractual obligation for National Bank, its subsidiaries and group entities. The details of this service offering and the conditions herein are subject to change.

The hyperlinks in this article may redirect to external websites not administered by National Bank. The Bank cannot be held liable for the content of external websites or any damages caused by their use.

Views expressed in this article are those of the person being interviewed. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of National Bank or its subsidiaries. For financial or business advice, please consult your National Bank advisor, financial planner or an industry professional (e.g., accountant, tax specialist or lawyer).

Categories

Categories